Aalto University Digital Design Laboratory, }ADD{

A selection of developed prototypes:

Portable Pressurized Air Gun

The air gun was composed of several 3D printed parts, including a nozzle with varying diameter, which allowed changing the air pressure while in use. The gun was devised by mechatronic students. ADD was able to take away how well the printed ABS material could handle the pressure.

Department of Engineering Design and Production,
Aalto School of Engineering
Petri Kuosmanen, Professor


Custom Sensor Holder

The functioning prototype contained a laser sensor used to measure the distance between itself and the road. It functioned while the vehicle was in motion. The large scale prototype was printed in two parts, and designed to fit into a car wheel well. It was considered a completely customizable and highly functional one-off product.

Department of Engineering Design and Production,
Aalto School of Engineering
Panu Sainio, Senior Engineer


Custom Tire Texture Model

This model was developed as a service for a tire manufacturer, who wanted to explore how they could benefit from 3D printing. ADD provided the machines to make a series of prototypes. The 10x10 plastic samples were tested for their friction coefficient against various surfaces. Based on these tests, it was suggested that the tire manufacturer purchase an Object Multi-material printer.

Department of Engineering Design and Production,
Aalto School of Engineering
Panu Sainio, Senior Engineer


Custom Gear System

The Aalto Car Lab developed this prototype, when a Ph.D student wanted to test a vehicle gear system that was 15cm in diameter. The test was successful, but the fit of the gears was too loose to allow for actual application.

Department of Engineering Design and Production,
Aalto School of Engineering
Panu Sainio, Senior Engineer
Jari Holopainen, Postdoctoral Researcher


Microfactory Parts

Together with the Aalto chemical engineering department, ADD tested how existing factory processes would work on a miniature scale. The factory material leaked through the scaled down parts and chemicals damaged the ABS material from further use. Post-processing was tried through the iteration process, but it was not enough to make the 3D printed parts functional.

Department of Biotechnology and Chemical Technology,
Aalto School of Chemical Technology
Mikko Ojala, Doctoral Student


Nanofilm keyboard enclosure.

PDP Metso miniature model of a soundproof wall around a machine.

Half of a joystick base of a forestry machine.

Custom Enclosure for Electronic Device

An ongoing collaboration with the Aalto electronics department, students are constantly designing different enclosures for their electronics. The technique is typically to mill the enclosures, and the metal material doesn’t correspond with the final product that is generally plastic. 3D printing the design at an earlier stage allows for more successful comparison to the final product and students are able to include details such as snap fitting.

Department of Electronics,
Aalto School of Electrical Engineering
Oleg Kovalev, Researcher


ADD TEAM:
Sergei Chekurov, Engineer
Meng Wang, Engineer